“Travel and change of place impart new vigor to the mind.” – Seneca

Quote

Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca; ca. 4 BC – AD 65) was a Roman Stoic philosopherstatesman,dramatist, and in one work humorist, of the Silver Age of Latin literature. He was tutor and later advisor to emperor Nero. While he was later forced to commit suicide for alleged complicity in the Pisonian conspiracy to assassinate Nero, the last of the Julio-Claudian emperors, he may have been innocent. (Wikipedia)

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‘Traveling the World’ is the #1 Priority for Men & Women

Women Choose Travel Over Family

Passports before pacifiers.

By Kristin Wong Mon 5:34 PM
(Article on MSN Live here)

According to a new poll, women want to trot the globe before they walk down the aisle. Bing researched the life goals of British men and women, and the top priority among women was traveling the world, which ranked higher than getting married or having a family.

Photo: Andersen Ross/Getty Images

According to sociologist Jenni Trent Hughes, the results are just proof of what we already knew—women are substantially more independent now than they were merely a generation ago.

“Getting married would have been at the top of the list for women over a decade or two ago, but now with our hard-won independence and more equal footing in society women are just as ready to travel the world as men.”

But that’s not to say that starting a family isn’t on the list at all. In fact, having a family came in second for women in Bing’s poll. For men, it came in third.

Interestingly, women’s third priority was living in another country, which trumped getting married. So it appears that, not only is marriage not in the top three priorities for British women, they also don’t view it as a prerequisite for having kids. The poll results back up the statistics—cohabitation is on the rise, while marriage numbers have declined.

A somewhat similar American study from TIME that revealed marriage is more important to men than it is to women—53 percent of women listed marriage as a top priority, compared to 58 percent of men.

On the other hand, Bing found that getting married came in low on men’s list of top ten priorities. At number nine, marriage barely beat out acting in a movie.

Also on women’s list of lifetime goals? Swimming with the dolphins and owning a bar or restaurant. On the guy’s side, they want to drive an F1 car and record an album.

(Photo: Andersen Ross/Getty Images)

Women’s Life To-Do List:

  1. Traveling the world
  2. Having a family
  3. Living in another country
  4. Getting married
  5. Learning a new skill
  6. Owning a shop
  7. Striking the work life balance
  8. Owning a bar or restaurant
  9. Swimming with dolphins
  10. Recording an album

Men’s Life To-Do List:

  1. Traveling the world
  2. Living in another country
  3. Having a family
  4. Learning a new skill
  5. Driving an F1 car
  6. Recording an album
  7. Striking the work life balance
  8. Owning a bar or restaurant
  9. Getting married
  10. Acting in a film

    Kristin Wong

    • Kristin Wong is a pop culture writer living in Los Angeles. She writes for a weekly national entertainment news show and contributes to various comedy blogs, web series and sketch groups.

Think in a Foreign Language to Make Better Decisions

 Lifehacker
(www.lifehacker.com) 

 
Think in a Foreign Language to Make Better Decisions
BY THORIN KLOSOWSKI

 APR 25, 2012

Think in a Foreign Language to Make Better Decisions

Everyone makes at least a couple risky decisions a day. It might be as complex as an expensive purchase, or as simple as picking between a Hot Pocket and a salad for lunch. Either way, you have a decision making bias based on years of experience that’s going to make you more likely to take a bad risk. However, a new study published in the journal Psychological Science suggests one way to decrease that risk is to think through the decision in another language.

Researchers conducted several studies with students to test their decision making biases. In each test a subset of students had to think about decisions ranging from how much money to bet away to how to rationally fight a disease. The researchers found that when you think through a decision in a foreign language you can reduce the framing effect that alters your bias. Thinking in a foreign language also increases the likelihood of taking a low-loss, high-gain bet because it alters your perception of loss and lets you see a bigger picture.

In the end, the researchers believe that thinking in a second language provides a kind of cognitive distance that promotes analytical thought and reduces emotion. It operates like a screen door in your decision making, giving you enough time to pause and consider deeper ramifications and remove emotional reaction from a choice. We know that ignoring your prejudices helps you make better decisions and provided you can speak at least one foreign language (and if not here are a few suggestions for learning a language) this could prove to be an important facet of your decision making toolkit.

The Foreign-Language Effect | Psychological Science

The Foreign-Language Effect
(Original article here)

Thinking in a Foreign Tongue Reduces Decision Biases
Boaz Keysar,
Sayuri L. Hayakawa and
Sun Gyu An
Author Affiliation
The University of Chicago
Boaz Keysar, University of Chicago—Psychology, 5848 S. University Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 E-mail: boaz@uchicago.edu

Abstract

Would you make the same decisions in a foreign language as you would in your native tongue? It may be intuitive that people would make the same choices regardless of the language they are using, or that the difficulty of using a foreign language would make decisions less systematic. We discovered, however, that the opposite is true: Using a foreign language reduces decision-making biases. Four experiments show that the framing effect disappears when choices are presented in a foreign tongue. Whereas people were risk averse for gains and risk seeking for losses when choices were presented in their native tongue, they were not influenced by this framing manipulation in a foreign language. Two additional experiments show that using a foreign language reduces loss aversion, increasing the acceptance of both hypothetical and real bets with positive expected value. We propose that these effects arise because a foreign language provides greater cognitive and emotional distance than a native tongue does.

NO REGRETS — Learn from the “Experts” How to Live Your Best Life Now

“Travel is so rewarding that it should take precedence over other things younger people spend money on.”   — Dr. Pillemer, Cornell University

 

PERSONAL HEALTH

Advice From Life’s Graying Edge on Finishing With No Regrets

By 
Published: January 9, 2012
Original Article from the New York Times on January 10, 2012  — (click here)
At 17, I wrote a speech titled, “When You Come to the End of Your Days, Will You Be Able to Write Your Own Epitaph?” It reflected the approach to life I adopted after my mother’s untimely death from cancer at age 49. I chose to live each day as if it could be my last — but with a watchful eye on the future in case it wasn’t.
Yvetta Fedorova

My goal was, and still is, to die without regrets.

For more than 50 years, this course has served me well, including my decision to become a science journalist instead of pursuing what had promised to be a more lucrative and prestigious, but probably less enjoyable, career as a biochemist. I find joy each day in mundane things too often overlooked: sunrises and sunsets, an insect on a flower, crows chasing a hawk, a majestic tree, a child at play, an act of kindness toward a stranger.

Eventually, most of us learn valuable lessons about how to conduct a successful and satisfying life. But for far too many people, the learning comes too late to help them avoid painful mistakes and decades of wasted time and effort.

In recent years, for example, many talented young people have denied their true passions, choosing instead to pursue careers that promise fast and big monetary gains. High rates of divorce speak to an impulsiveness to marry and a tenuous commitment to vows of “till death do us part.”

Parents undermine children’s self-confidence and self-esteem by punishing them physically or pushing them down paths, both academic and athletic, that they are ill equipped to follow. And myriad prescriptions forantidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs reflect a widespread tendency to sweat the small stuff, a failure to recognize time-honored sources of happiness, and a reliance on material acquisitions that provide only temporary pleasure.

Enter an invaluable source of help, if anyone is willing to listen while there is still time to take corrective action. It is a new book called “30 Lessons for Living” (Hudson Street Press) that offers practical advice from more than 1,000 older Americans from different economic, educational and occupational strata who were interviewed as part of the ongoing Cornell Legacy Project.

Its author, Karl Pillemer, a professor of human development at the College of Human Ecology at Cornell and a gerontologist at the Weill Cornell Medical College, calls his subjects “the experts,” and their advice is based on what they did right and wrong in their long lives. Many of the interviews can be viewed at legacyproject.human.cornell.edu.

Here is a summary of their most salient thoughts.

ON MARRIAGE A satisfying marriage that lasts a lifetime is more likely to result when partners are fundamentally similar and share the same basic values and goals. Although romantic love initially brings most couples together, what keeps them together is an abiding friendship, an ability to communicate, a willingness to give and take, and a commitment to the institution of marriage as well as to each other.

An 89-year-old woman who was glad she stayed in her marriage even though her young husband’s behavior was adversely affected by his military service said, “Too many young people now are giving up too early, too soon.”

ON CAREERS Not one person in a thousand said that happiness accrued from working as hard as you can to make money to buy whatever you want. Rather, the near-universal view was summed up by an 83-year-old former athlete who worked for decades as an athletic coach and recruiter: “The most important thing is to be involved in a profession that you absolutely love, and that you look forward to going to work to every day.”

Although it can take a while to land that ideal job, you should not give up looking for one that makes you happy. Meanwhile, if you’re stuck in a bad job, try to make the most of it until you can move on. And keep in mind that a promotion may be flattering and lucrative but not worth it if it takes you away from what you most enjoy doing.

ON PARENTING The demands of modern life often have a negative effect on family life, especially when economic pursuits limit the time parents spend with their children. Most important, the elders said, is to spend more time with your children, even if you must sacrifice to do so.

Share in their activities, and do things with them that interest them. Time spent together enables parents to detect budding problems and instill important values.

While it’s normal to prefer one child over others, it is critical not to make comparisons and show favoritism. Discipline is important when needed, but physical punishment is rarely effective and can result in children who are aggressive and antisocial.

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Original Article from the New York Times on January 10, 2012  — (click here)

Give Your Employees Unlimited Vacation Days

(FY Says… Yes !  I would love to see US companies take the lead in a workplace revolution.    Traveling is food for the soul.  A culture that “shows appreciation” and “treats employees like the adults they are” is a welcome revolution.)

LEAPS AND BOUNDS

Give Your Employees Unlimited Vacation Days

Will it improve company culture? Sure. But can giving workers all the time off they want also increase their productivity?

By Joe Reynolds |  @RedFrogEvents   | Jan 5, 2012

The 9 a.m.-to-5 p.m. workplace is almost dead. Throw your preconceived notions about vacation out the window and give your employees the no-strings-attached, unlimited vacation days they deserve or you’ll soon be a dinosaur.

With an unparalleled culture in which our people actually enjoy coming to work (see Your Employees Need a Treehouse and Let Your Employees Choose Their Titles) as the foundation, every last Red Frog employee is unflinchingly focused and devoted to our mission. Producing vast amounts of quality work is the norm, so we reward them with unlimited vacation and they, in return, reward Red Frog with outstanding work that blows me away every single day.

Taking vacation at Red Frog is encouraged (and even celebrated). And it’s not abused. Ever. By anyone. Simply make sure your work is getting done and make sure you’re covered while you’re away and that’s it—no questions asked.

The pessimists and naysayers have said this policy would either be abused or that it’s not entirely real—that our employees feel pressured to never take off. I assure you they’re underestimating a positive work culture and are simply wrong. Also, I feel sorry for their workplace.

Through building a company on accountability, mutual respect, and teamwork, we’ve seen our unlimited vacation day policy have tremendous results for our employees’ personal development and for productivity. There. I said it. I think Red Frog is moreproductive by giving unlimited vacation days. Here’s why:

  1. It treats employees like the adults they are. If they’re incapable of handling the responsibility that comes along with having unlimited vacation days, they’re probably incapable of handling other responsibilities too, so don’t hire them.
  2. It reduces costs by not having to track vacation time. Tracking and accounting for vacation days can be cumbersome work. This policy eliminates those headaches.
  3. It shows appreciation. Your employees will need unexpected time off and some need more vacation than others. By giving them what they need when they need it, you show your employees how much you appreciate them and they reciprocate by producing more great work.
  4. It’s a great recruitment tool. We hire a mere one out of every 750 applicants at Red Frog. When you combine fantastic benefits with a positive culture, it’s noticed.

I lead by example. I worked more 100 hours last week, but this week, as I write this column, I’m watching surfers and sipping a delicious Hawaiian brew.

Joe Reynolds

Joe Reynolds is an entrepreneur at heart who decided to pursue his passion by turning a $5,000 investment in an event production business called Red Frog into a thriving $45 million company in just four years. Red Frog Events was named the 2011 U.S. Chamber of Commerce Small Business of the Year and recently won the Chicago Innovation Award as well as the Chicago TribuneBest Workplace.

(Original Article from Inc.com  — click here)