The Freedom Year Trend Starts with the “Globals’ Generation Focuses On Experience”

Hopefully, the ‘Globals’ will push a change in corporate America.  Americans need to develop the so-called soft skills:  global mindset, culturally curious & intelligent, as well as speaking another language.

Someday, the talk at the water cooler won’t just be about leaving for maternity or for your MBA.  It will also be expected to take a Freedom Year (sabbatical) to travel, work, and volunteer abroad.

Go Globals!

Cheers

Anthony

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Globals’ Generation Focuses On Experience

by SAM SANDERS
(Original Article via NPR.com here)

Jennifer Larr (center), 24, is seen here in Rwanda at the Gashora Girls Academy where she was a teacher in 2011. Larr is part of a new generation of young adults focusing on travel, studying abroad and global experiences.

Courtesy of Jennifer LarrJennifer Larr (center), 24, is seen here in Rwanda at the Gashora Girls Academy where she was a teacher in 2011. Larr is part of a new generation of young adults focusing on travel, studying abroad and global experiences.

Jennifer Larr has the itch to go abroad. She’s 26 years old and has already spent a year studying in France and two years in Rwanda with the Peace Corps, and she is headed to Uganda this summer for an internship. She’s also a graduate student, studying international relations at UCLA.

Larr is part of a growing number of 20- and early 30-somethings whose American dream has moved beyond suburban homes and traditional nuclear families, and it’s one that now goes even beyond U.S. borders.

Larr and others like her are more likely than previous generations to live, study and work abroad. As they travel the world, they’re now abandoning some of the traditional tenets of the American dream that their parents held dear.

National pollster John Zogby has been chronicling this trend for years. His book The Way We’ll Be: The Zogby Report on the Transformation of the American Dream discusses some of the changes taking place in Larr’s generation. He has a name for young people like her: “first globals.”

They understand this idea of a shared fate, or a linked fate. That somehow, what happens to somebody in Mumbai may have an effect on me in West Los Angeles.
– Franklin Gilliam, dean, UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs

“Two out of three of them have passports,” Zogby says. “They are well-traveled; technologically they have networks that include people all over the world. They have a desire to be nimble, to go anywhere and to be anywhere. They also have a desire to change their world and feel like they’re in a position to do that.”

It’s a generation just as likely to watch the World Cup as it is the Super Bowl. It’s not, however, just the children of the wealthy and the educated, says Zogby. “This is expanding beyond the Wellesleys and the Stanfords,” he says. “It’s different now.”

There are a few reasons why. More than 270,000 students studied abroad in the 2009-2010 school year, according to the International Institute of Education. That number is three times what it was two decades earlier. At the same time, the Internet and social media have made every part of the world seem instantly accessible. America’s youth is just more diverse — and international — than ever.

On top of being globally minded, Zogby says, these first globals have a different perspective on the idea of ownership as a tenet of the American dream. They are putting less emphasis on accumulating traditional things like homes, cars and the types of families their parents had. Instead, they’re putting more energy into acquiring experience.

Larr, for instance, says she can do without the house and the kids.

“People will always rent you apartments wherever you go, [and] not every woman wants to have a child and be a mother, and be in the house all the time,” Larr says.

She could even do without the marriage.

“I’ve been in a really long-term relationship, and we’re really happy the way we are. We can be committed to each other without necessarily having someone approve it,” she says.

Zogby says that all of this is reflected in his research, and that much of what made older generations tick just doesn’t work for first globals.

“The permanence of owning things doesn’t exist,” Zogby says. “The permanence of living somewhere doesn’t exist. The permanence of getting a job and holding on to that job for the next 40 years doesn’t exist.”

For many of these first globals, the idea of public service is a common thread. La Mikia Castillo, 28, recently graduated from USC’s Price School of Public Policy. Her family is from the U.S. and Panama, and she has studied and traveled in Mexico, Costa Rica and Guatemala.

“My American dream is for other people to be able to achieve whatever they want to achieve,” Castillo says. “It’s not really about me and what I have as an individual. It’s about trying to make a difference around the world.”

Franklin Gilliam, dean of UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs, says dreams like Castillo’s represent a new way of seeing the world that’s become common among first globals.

“It’s a sea change in orientation,” Gilliam says. “They understand this idea of a shared fate, or a linked fate. That somehow, what happens to somebody in Mumbai may have an effect on me in West Los Angeles.”

Julia Capizzi, a 33-year-old recent USC graduate who is studying for the Foreign Service exam, agrees.

“The larger world beyond L.A., beyond Chicago and my immediate experiences is an extension of me,” Capizzi says. “So I feel an obligation to know what that is. Otherwise I feel like I’m walking around with blinders on.”

Capizzi also says her American dream is better than that of her parents, because she and people like her aren’t afraid to literally go anywhere to accomplish their goals.

“I think that my generation will be more fulfilled than my parents’ generation,” she says.

But she admits that she had to make some sacrifices to live the life of a first global. She doesn’t own a car or a house, and she says she would love to have already owned a house. There are a lot of different parts of her life, she says, that she’s had to come to peace with to pursue her goals.

In spite of any reservations, the Capizzis, Castillos and Larrs are here to stay, says Zogby, as is their new take on the American dream, and it may upend traditional ideas of family and citizenship as we now know it.

“[There are] going to be so many families out there where Papa’s in Singapore and Mama’s in Mauritius, and Baby is somewhere back and forth,” he says.

The question is, what will that baby’s dream be? And will it even be called American?

Correction July 10, 2012

The audio of this story, as did a previous Web version, incorrectly gives Jennifer Larr’s age as 24. She is 26.

Ahhhh…. Playa del Carmen, México

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‘Traveling the World’ is the #1 Priority for Men & Women

Women Choose Travel Over Family

Passports before pacifiers.

By Kristin Wong Mon 5:34 PM
(Article on MSN Live here)

According to a new poll, women want to trot the globe before they walk down the aisle. Bing researched the life goals of British men and women, and the top priority among women was traveling the world, which ranked higher than getting married or having a family.

Photo: Andersen Ross/Getty Images

According to sociologist Jenni Trent Hughes, the results are just proof of what we already knew—women are substantially more independent now than they were merely a generation ago.

“Getting married would have been at the top of the list for women over a decade or two ago, but now with our hard-won independence and more equal footing in society women are just as ready to travel the world as men.”

But that’s not to say that starting a family isn’t on the list at all. In fact, having a family came in second for women in Bing’s poll. For men, it came in third.

Interestingly, women’s third priority was living in another country, which trumped getting married. So it appears that, not only is marriage not in the top three priorities for British women, they also don’t view it as a prerequisite for having kids. The poll results back up the statistics—cohabitation is on the rise, while marriage numbers have declined.

A somewhat similar American study from TIME that revealed marriage is more important to men than it is to women—53 percent of women listed marriage as a top priority, compared to 58 percent of men.

On the other hand, Bing found that getting married came in low on men’s list of top ten priorities. At number nine, marriage barely beat out acting in a movie.

Also on women’s list of lifetime goals? Swimming with the dolphins and owning a bar or restaurant. On the guy’s side, they want to drive an F1 car and record an album.

(Photo: Andersen Ross/Getty Images)

Women’s Life To-Do List:

  1. Traveling the world
  2. Having a family
  3. Living in another country
  4. Getting married
  5. Learning a new skill
  6. Owning a shop
  7. Striking the work life balance
  8. Owning a bar or restaurant
  9. Swimming with dolphins
  10. Recording an album

Men’s Life To-Do List:

  1. Traveling the world
  2. Living in another country
  3. Having a family
  4. Learning a new skill
  5. Driving an F1 car
  6. Recording an album
  7. Striking the work life balance
  8. Owning a bar or restaurant
  9. Getting married
  10. Acting in a film

    Kristin Wong

    • Kristin Wong is a pop culture writer living in Los Angeles. She writes for a weekly national entertainment news show and contributes to various comedy blogs, web series and sketch groups.

10 Biggest Parties Around the World

Happy Friday !

Same bar, same crowd tonight?

Desire something a bit more exciting ? Then check out this article on the 10 Biggest Parties in the World !

I can speak from experience that Songkran (World’s Biggest Water Fight) in Bangkok, Thailand, and La Tomatina in Buñol, Spain, (World’s Biggest Food Fight) are amazingly good times.

Put them on your ‘Freedom Year’ list !

Saludos from Mexico City !

Anthony

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10 Biggest Parties Around the World

by on MAY 15, 2008

(see original article here from Matador Network)

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Photo by grahammclellan

Mardi Gras? Carnival? Octoberfest? The Running of the Bulls? Been there. Done that.

EVERYONE KNOWS ABOUT these parties. They’re great. They’re famous. But most people go to them once and never come back. Let’s talk about parties where the same people return year after year.

In no particular order, here are our top 10 must see parties:

La Tomatina

What: Nobody is really sure how it began- practical joke? A harmless food fight between two merchants? A prank? No one knows but this messy fiesta has been a strong tradition since 1945. On the last Wednesday in August, about 30,000 people descend on this little town to participate in the world’s largest food fight. Never had that massive cafeteria food fight when you were younger? Well, here’s your chance.

When: The last Wednesday in August.

Where: The tiny town of Buñol in the Valencia region of Spain

Bring: Throw-away clothes and goggles! Tomato juice in the eye stings!
Learn more

Full Moon Party

What: Legend has it that the Full Moon Party started as a birthday party in the 80s. The backpackers decided to come back again and again. Soon word spread and every month, backpackers would head to KPG to party.

Over the years, the hippy party morphed into a 20,000 person festival. Even in the low season, the party still sees about 10,000 visitors. Many people will tell you that it’s lost its charm over the years but for a serious dose of all night (and all day) partying in Thailand, this is place to get it.

When: During the full moon, every month

Where: Ko Pha Ngan, Thailand

Bring: Your drinking shoes, a red bull, facepaint, and clothes you don’t care about.
Learn more

Burning Man

What: Looking for the ultimate arts extravaganza? Burning Man is for you! An 8 day festival that culminates in the burning of a 72ft wooden man, this festival is where you can cut loose. Each year has a theme (this year, it’s “American Dream”) and last year 47,000 people decided to join the fun.

When: Starts 8 days before the American Labor Day, September

Where:
Blackrock Desert, Nevada USA

Bring: Everything BUT money! Burning Man runs on a full barter system and the only things you can buy are water and ice. Aside from the obvious supplies you’d take camping, other essentials include sunblock, a Camel Back and goggles. MOST importantly, bring something that allows you to participate–that’s what Burning Man is all about.
Learn more

Songkran

What: Songkran is the Thai New Year. It’s a spiritual festival designed to cool you down and wash away the sins of the previous year. What better way of doing that than by committing a few new ones, right away? Songkran takes place all over the country with everyone embarking on possibly the world’s largest water fight.

When: Mid-April

Where: Anywhere in the land of Smiles (Bangkok and Chang Mai have the biggest parties)

Bring: Anything you don’t mind wearing only once, a water gun, extra water, and a good attitude.
Learn more

Glastonbury Music Festival

What: A 3 day music festival designed to celebrate the earth, music, and the arts, this festival brings in people from all over the world. Last year’s event had over 177,000 people and 700 musical acts.

When: The last weekend in June

Where:
Pilton, England

Bring:
Tickets, a tent, sleeping bag, food, and whatever else you “need” to have fun.
Learn more

Holi

What: Similar to the Thai holiday of Songrkan, Holi is a two day Hindu spring festival that occurs in northern India. The first night is marked by bonfires, and the second day is spent pleasuring your inner 2nd grader by splashing colored flour and water over everybody. It’s a celebration about renewal.

Photo: FaceMePLS
When: The full moon in March.Where: India

Bring: Red, orange, and green flour, lots of water, clothes you don’t need!
Learn more

Bay to Breakers

What: It’s supposed to be a 7 mile foot race but instead it’s a 7 mile costume party and keg race that goes through downtown San Francisco. It began in 1906 to keep people’s sprits up after the earthquake and locals are still keeping that alive, in force! Over 70,000 people, congregate downtown in costumes (or nothing at all) and shopping carts filled with kegs. A little Mardi Gras + a little Halloween college party = a lot of fun.

When: The third Sunday in May.

Where:
San Francisco, California

Bring:
A crazy costume and lots of beer!
Learn more

Australia Day

What: Australians love two things: beer and bbqs. No day brings out the best in these two than Australia Day, when Aussies celebrate the first European settlement on the continent of Australia. Aussies, a normally festive bunch, kick it up a notch all over the country with bbqs, music, and beer. From the cities to the towns, Aussies are out in full force. If you don’t already have an Aussie friend to take you under his/her wing, head to a beach with beer and make some new friends! Most Australians would love nothing more to break in a newbie!

Photo by Scootie

When: January 26

Where:
Anywhere in Oz!

Bring: Your Australian pride, a case of Carlton draught or Coopers, and something for the grill.
Learn more

Queen’s Day

What: The normally reserved Dutch cut lose to celebrate the birth of their Queen. Originally to celebrate the birth of Juliana, the day now celebrates the birth of Beatrix, whose January birthday makes it cold to party. All over the country, the Dutch head outside with their beer and music, flood the streets in orange, and cruise up and down the canals in revelry.

When: April 30th

Where: The Netherlands (Amsterdam has the biggest party)

Bring: Anything orange!
Learn more

Calgary Stampede

What: A 10 day rodeo that attracts over a million visitors during its course. The festival features a parade and is the largest event in Canada. But don’t come to watch the rodeo, come for the party! The throngs of people who flock to Calgary are there for the revelry, the beer, and the girls (or boys).

When: Second week in July

Where:
Calgary, Alberta

Bring: Your best cowboy outfit and a tolerance for country music.
Learn more